Quote

"

“Consider that all the wealth of the world can’t buy a liquid more pleasurable than water after intense thirst.”

Live thirsty.

"

-

Excerpt From: Nassim Nicholas Taleb. “Antifragile.”

Store: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewBook?id=522380506

Quote

"Growth is a greater mystery than death. All of us can understand failure … but not even the successful man can begin to describe the impalpable elations and apprehensions of growth."

- Norman Mailer, born on this day in 1923, on the rat race of success and what true growth means – beautiful read. (via explore-blog)
Source: explore-blog
Quote

"The irony, of course, is that the more data we mine, and the closer we come to determining a precise calculus of sharing, the less likely it will be for what we know to remain true. If emotion and arousal are key, then, in a social application of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, we may be changing what will become popular even as we’re studying it. “If everyone is perfectly implementing the best headline to pass on, it’s not as effective any more,” [University of Pennsylvania marketing professor Jonah] Berger says. “What used to be emotionally arousing simply isn’t any longer.”"

-

The New Yorker looks at the science of what makes something go viral, in which University of Pennsylvania researchers found that positivity, arousal, and a sense of social currency drive people to share links. There is, of course, the obvious dark side – before we get too carried away, let’s not forget Schopenhauer’s admonition.

For a deeper look, see Berger’s book Contagious: Why Things Catch On.

(via explore-blog)

Anti-virality principle.

(via explore-blog)

Source:
Quote

"

Solid science sometimes devolves into pseudoscience, but the imprimatur of being science nevertheless may remain. No better example of this is the popular “left brain/right brain” narrative about the specializations of the cerebral hemispheres. According to this narrative, the left hemisphere is logical, analytic, and linguistic whereas the right is intuitive, creative, and perceptual. Moreover, each of us purportedly relies primarily on one half-brain, making us “left-brain thinkers” or “right-brain thinkers.”

This characterization is misguided, and it’s time to put it to rest.

Two major problems can be identified at the onset:

First, the idea that each of us relies primarily on one or the other hemisphere is not empirically justifiable. The evidence indicates that each of us uses all of our brain, not primarily one side or the other. The brain is a single, interactive system, with the parts working in concert to accomplish a given task.

Second, the functions of the two hemispheres have been mischaracterized. Without question, the two hemispheres engage in some different kinds of information processing. For example, the left preferentially processes details of objects we see whereas the right preferentially processes the overall shape of objects we see; the left preferentially processes syntax (the literal meaning), the right pragmatics (the indirect or implied meaning) and so forth. Our two hemispheres are not like our two lungs: One is not a “spare” for the other, redundant in function. But none of these well-documented hemispheric differences come close to what’s described in the popular narrative.

It is time to move past the popular but incorrect left brain/right brain narrative.

"

-

Psychologist Stephen M. Kosslyn, director of Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, is among the 176 prominent scientists who answered this year’s Edge Question: ”What scientific idea is ready for retirement?”

Also see this animated case against the left/right brain divide, then look back on previous compendiums of famous scientists’ answers to the annual Edge Questions, including “What scientific concept will improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit?” (2012) and “What is your favorite deep, elegant, or beautiful explanation?” (2013).

(via explore-blog)

(via explore-blog)

Source:
Quote

"A place for everything.
Everything in its place."

-

Benjamin Franklin.

And my personal mantra as I organize my virtual world.

Link

2012: The Year I Wasn't Jewish

arfs:

The common year is two-thousand twelve, though it’s less commonly known as 5773 according to an ancient agricultural lunisolar mapping of the universe still used by some.

This year, the common year, showed no sign that I was - am - Jewish.

I used not a single candle in celebration. I built…

Just as relevant today as it was then.

Source: arfs
Quote

"

There’s been a flood of handwringing op-eds lately about how glassy-eyed mobile-phone zombies are ignoring each other at the restaurant instead of talking to another another. I think these pundits are somewhat overblowing the frequency of this behavior, frankly. Very similar alarms were raised about the wave of supposedly society-ending isolation that would wreaked by previous newfangled media — like the telephone in the late 19th century, and the Walkman in the 80s. We didn’t suffer a social apocalypse then, and I don’t think we’re going to suffer one now.

That said, I actually think the op-ed handwringing is useful in its own way. It’s part of how a society creates social codes around new technologies. When mobile phones inched into the mainstream in the 90s, people who bought them used to answer them, every single time they rang, whenever and wherever they rang: At the dinner table, at the funeral, while having sex. It took about a decade of this behavior peaking before society collectively began to realize this was kind of terrible behavior, and we starting poking fun at it — you saw lots of jokes about it, like that “inconsiderate cell phone man” ad that used to run before movies. And eventually we moved away from the behavior. We’re probably in the middle of this curve with social media.

"

-

In this fantastic interview, Clive Thompson offers a refreshingly lucid antidote to all the techno-dystopia about how the age of connectivity is killing our offline lives. Thompson is the author of Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better, one of the best science and technology books of the year

(via The Dish)

Genius commentary.

(via explore-blog)

Source:
Quote

"We but mirror the world. All the tendencies present in the outer world are to be found in the world of our body. If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. This is the divine mystery supreme. A wonderful thing it is and the source of our happiness. We need not wait to see what others do."

- Gandhi’s actual quote, often paraphrased as “Be the change you want to see in the world.
Text

Fact: Commuter dressed based on weather predictions. He walks down the street through rain and sleet. Ice is stinging every part of his exposed face. He continues his Monday morning commute wondering how bad the week could start. 

Fact^Prime: Commuter dresses based on weather predictions. He walks down the street through rain and sleet. Ice is stinging every part of his exposed face. He thinks how fortunate he is to be able bodied. His face feels. His legs move with ease. His eyes see others. They join each other in that moment; a smirk of shared experience.

Fact: Commuter slips on escalator, spilling contents of coffee in process, wetting his back on slushy footprints of others. He sits, embarrassed. He continues his Monday morning commute wondering how bad the week could start. 

Fact^Prime: Commuter slips on escalator, spilling contents of coffee in process, wetting his back on slushy footprints of others. He sits, embarrassed. He wonders how it’s possible not any of the hot coffee spilled on him or others on a busy morning commute. He wonders how unlikely it is he didn’t hurt himself in the fall or a small boy nearby with his clumsiness. He’s thankful. So thankful.

Text

I made this for Camus’ 100th bday and posted it to Reddit here: http://buff.ly/1b9JNhu

"In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer."

original image from: http://wakpaper.com/large/Winter_wallpapers_260.jpg
quote from: www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/a/albertcamu104177.html